Dr. Peter J. Wosh

Director of the Archives and Public History Program


pw1@nyu.edu

RESEARCH

Archival management; American Christianity; local and community history; institutions and organizations.

My research has focused primarily on archival management, public history, American religion, and American institutional cultures. My books have included: Waldo Gifford Leland and the Origins of the American Archival Profession (Chicago: Society of American Archivists, 2011), which traces the early years and development of the archives profession through the life and writings of one of its key founders; co-edited with Russell James, Public Relations and Marketing for Archives: A How-To-Do-It Manual, which includes a series of suggestions for promoting and advocating archives; Privacy and Confidentiality Perspectives: Archivists and Archival Records (Chicago: Society of American Archivists, 2005), co-edited with Menzi Behrnd-Klodt, which discusses the complex privacy challenges facing archivists in a rapidly changing technological climate; and Covenant House: Journey of a Faith-Based Charity (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005), which focuses on a major child-welfare philanthropy that underwent a highly publicized clergy sexual abuse scandal in 1990. I have also authored Spreading the Word: The Bible Business in Nineteenth-Century America (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1988), which related the American Bible Society‚Äôs development over the course of the nineteenth-century and considered broader changes in the nation’s corporate, benevolent, and philanthropic structures; and edited the diary of Michael Augustine Corrigan, the Roman Catholic bishop of Newark from 1872-1880 and a major conservative prelate in the nineteenth-century Church. I am most interested in the ways in which different cultures of information have developed over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

TEACHING

Introduction to Archives, Introduction to Public History, Internship Seminar, Research Seminar

My teaching interests reflect these research projects. I teach a year-long introductory overview of the archival profession that seeks to blend theory and practice. A full range of topics, including appraisal, arrangement and description, reference, legal and ethical issues, records management, and the intellectual and social history of the profession are incorporated into the core course. In addition, students receive extensive field experiences designed to apply classroom theory in real-world settings. I also have taught history courses that chart the history of Christianity in nineteenth-and twentieth-century America, discuss approaches to local and community history, and explore historical research methods. I strive to maintain a collaborative approach in my classes, and value participatory, seminar-style courses.

SCHOLARSHIP:

BOOKS

Waldo Gifford Leland and the Origins of the American Archival Profession (Chicago: Society of American Archivists, 2011);

Co-Editor, Public Relations and Marketing for Archives (New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2011);

Covenant House: Journey of a Faith-Based Charity (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005;

Co-Editor, Privacy and Confidentiality Perspectives: Archivists and Archival Records (Chicago: Society of American Archivists, 2005);

Spreading the Word: The Bible Business in Nineteenth-Century America (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994);

Co-Editor, The Diocesan Journal of Michael Augustine Corrigan, Bishop of Newark, New Jersey, 1872-1880 (Newark: New Jersey Historical Society, 1984)

SELECTED ARTICLES

“Missionary Priests and Faithful Parishioners in Southern New Jersey: A Regional Perspective on Nineteenth-Century Catholicism,” American Catholic Studies (Fall 2008), 45-63;

with Janet Bunde et al, “University Archives and Educational Partnerships,” Archival Issues (Fall 2008);

“Research and Reality Checks: New York University’s Program in Archival Management and Historical Editing,” American Archivist (Fall/Winter, 2000), 271-283;

“Going Postal,” American Archivist (Spring 1998), 220-239 [Winner, Fellows’ Posner Prize]

SOME RECENT PRESENTATIONS

“Faith and Frolicking in Nineteenth-Century Cape May,” Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference, Cape May NJ (April 2012);

Chair, “Digital Technology and the Twenty-First Century Classroom,” American Historical Association, Chicago IL (January 2012);

“Archives, Historians and the Future of Authority in the Archives,” American Historical Association, Chicago IL (January 2012);

“Here’s Waldo: Leland and the Creation of an American Archival Culture,” Society of American Archivists, Chicago IL (August 2011);

Chair, “Lest We Forget! The Triangle Fire, Communities of Remembrance, and the Commemoration of the Centennial Anniversary, 1911-2011,” National Council on Public History, Pensacola FL (April 2011);

“The Public History Introductory Course,” National Council on Public History, Pensacola FL (April 2011);

Moderator, “Wikileaks and the Archives and Records Profession: A Panel Discussion,” Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York (January 2011);

“New Approaches to Educating Editors,” Association for Documentary Editing, Phiadelphia PA (October 2010);

“Out of the Classroom and Into the Laboratory: Experimenting with Archives Education 3.0,” Society of American Archivists, Washington DC (August 2010)

HONORS AND AWARDS

Publications Editor, Society of American Archivists (2007-2013); Recipient of “Outstanding Graduate Educator Award” from GSAS (2010); Elected Fellow, Society of American Archivists (2001); Recipient, Fellows’ Posner Prize for best article appearing in American Archivist journal (2000); Recipient, Sr. M. Claude Lane Award for distinguished contributions to religious archives field (1993); Recipient of numerous grants from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, National Endowment for the Humanities, New York University Humanities Council, Louisville Institute for the Study of Protestantism and American Culture, and Institute for the Study of American Evangelicalism among others.

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