Summer Internship — National Anthropological Archives,

SUMMER 2010: Reference Internship at the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Title: Reference Services Intern
Description: The Reference Services Intern will assist the Reference Archivist with research questions, scheduling reference appointments, creating a system to track reference requests, blogging about the collection, and maintaining the reading room. As an integral part of the Reading Room, the Intern’s duties will include assisting patrons, retrieving boxes, interpreting catalog records and finding aids, and providing instruction on how to properly handle archival material. The intern will also work with students participating in the Smithsonian Institution’s Summer Institute in Museum Anthropology.
Who Should Apply: Graduate students in archives, museum, library, history, and anthropology programs. Recent graduates from these programs will also be considered.
Stipend Provided: Yes
Dates: June 21 to July 30 approximately 35 hours a week
Location: National Anthropological Archives, Museum Support Center (MSC), 4220 Silver Hill Road, Suitland, MD. http://www.nmnh.si.edu/naa/. The MSC is a 10 minute walk from the Suitland Station on the Green Line, or accessible via free shuttle from the National Mall.
How to apply: Interested students should send a resume and cover letter to Leanda Gahegan at gaheganl@si.edu by April 12, 2010. Please include relevant research interests and/or projects in your cover letter.
About the National Anthropological Archives: The National Anthropological Archives collects and preserves historical and contemporary anthropological materials that document the world’s cultures and the history of anthropology. It’s collections represent the four fields of anthropology – ethnology, linguistics, archaeology, and physical anthropology – and include manuscripts, field notes, correspondence, photographs, maps, sound recordings, film and video created by Smithsonian anthropologists and other preeminent scholars.

http://www.nmnh.si.edu/naa/

About the Smithsonian Institution Summer Institute in Museum Anthropology: SIMA is an intensive four-week training program that teaches graduate students how to use museum collections in research, incorporating Smithsonian collections as an integral part of their anthropological training.

http://anthropology.si.edu/summerinstitute/

Peter J. Wosh
Director, Archives/Public History Program
History Department
New York University
53 Washington Square South
New York NY 10012
Phone: (212) 998-8601
Fax: (212) 995-4017

http://history.fas.nyu.edu/object/history.gradprog.archivespublichistory.html

Peter Wosh

About Peter Wosh

Professor Wosh directs the program in Archives and Public History at NYU. Professor Wosh’s research has focused primarily on American religion, American institutional cultures, and archival management issues. His background includes work as an archivist in a variety of academic and nonprofit institutions, including: Director of Archives and Library Services, American Bible Society (1989-1994); Archivist/Records Manager, American Bible Society (1984-1989); University Archivist, Seton Hall University (1978-1984). He is the author of Privacy and Confidentiality Perspectives: Archivists and Archival Records, with Menzi Behrnd-Klodt (Chicago: Society of American Archivists, 2005); Covenant House: Journey of a Faith-Based Charity (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005); Spreading the Word: The Bible Business in Nineteenth-Century America (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994); The Diocesan Journal of Michael Augustine Corrigan, Bishop of Newark, New Jersey, 1872-1880 (Newark: New Jersey Historical Society, 1987); as well as articles in various archival, historical, and library journals. Professor Wosh’s current research involves editing the published writings of Waldo Gifford Leland, a pioneering archival theoretician, for the Archival Classics series published by the Society of American Archivists.

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